Maybe it’s because the Tara never properly focused the projector, but we didn’t like this so much. Thought it had its moments, and was an interesting idea for a documentary, done in a unique way, but with the unfocused images and the erratic editing (“kinetic” if you ask the imdb reviewers), I felt like I did at Mondovino… wanted to look away from the screen or close my eyes, and just rent it later.

The director says: “Iraq in Fragments illuminates post-war Iraq in three acts, building a picture of a country pulled in different directions by religion and ethnicity. Filmed in verité style with no scripted narration, the film explores the lives of ordinary Iraqis to illustrate and give background to larger trends in Iraqi society.”

First section follows a Sunni kid in Bagdhad with narration by the kid himself, getting beaten and tossed around and trying to hold down a job. Second section has more of a wandering focus, with a religious Shiite group planning strategies in a smaller city. Third section is in a rural area, with Kurdish farmers and brick-makers, again focused on a boy with his narration.

Katy didn’t like the way parts one and three had a personal focus and part two wasn’t about one person. I did like the variety, would’ve maybe preferred a third approach for the third section instead of bookending with two young kids talking about their dim futures.

Would have to see again, either on video or in focus.

I think the title Hurlevent means something about the wind.

Well-bred Catherine loves Roch, an orphan her family has raised from a young kid with the help of servant Helene. Catherine’s brother William has taken over their estate and wants to get rid of Roch. Cat meets Olivier by chance and stays at his estate, gets to know him and his sister Isabelle, he eventually proposes. Roch disappears after overhearing a conversation about his being below Cat’s social class, comes back rich three years later, Cat and Olivier are now engaged and William is a drunken gambling addict. Roch wins the estate from William and hangs around until Catherine dies from illness.

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Movie opens with a great looking dream scene of Catherine and Roch on a rocky hill while William watches, hidden. Has a few interesting parts like that, but mostly just a good-looking literary adaptation of a dreary story. Rivette’s not especially proud of it either… I think we can mostly ignore this one.

Interesting soundtrack, only used in a few scenes. Valérie Hazette in her Senses of Cinema article says: “The only concession to lyricism can be found in the magical accents of Le mystère des voix bulgares, a Bulgarian choir’s album.”

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Rivette says about the adaptation: “I had decided not to re-read it: I asked Pascal to summarise it for me. I only wanted to have the outline of the story and of the characters, that’s all. And from the start, I told him: “Only the first part”, because I knew about the second part. I had a very strong memory of the Wyler movie – because I hate it – and of the Buñuel movie because, as you know, I find it very beautiful. The characters are 40, but still, the movie remains very, very powerful.”

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Francois Truffaut died a few days after the shoot. “For the whole length of the shoot, every single day, we were expecting to receive the phone call that would tell us ‘François has died…’ it was a truly harrowing situation.”

“Since it was necessary to condense quite a lot, by force of circumstance, I believe that it is indeed the most elliptical of all my movies. Otherwise I might have made a three or three-and-a-half hour movie, like I usually do. But there, we were obliged to simplify, to keep to the essentials. It might have given a more vigorous and energetic feel to it …”

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More Out 1: intro, actors/characters, story day 2

Episode 1 – From Lili to Thomas

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Opening titles, very specific. Ignore the Italian subtitles and TV station logo.

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We open on Lili’s group doing warmup exercises and trying some things out.

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Meanwhile, deaf/dumb Colin is harassing diners and Frederique is robbing them.

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Thomas’s Prometheus group totally improvs around a red dressing manneqin for a very long time, getting messy and having some fun.

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Lili’s group has screaming practice.

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Colin stamps more beggar cards, and Fred dreams of death.

——————–
Episode 2 – From Thomas to Frederique

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Prometheus group discusses their options, looks for visual inspiration.

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Beatrice meets the ethnologist and I forget what they say to each other, but Wikipedia says they were in a relationship. Fred introduces us to Honey Moon.

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MARIE gives the first (or second?) note to Colin! Marie!!

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Lili and Elaine have a chat. Nicolas is acting up.

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Colin gets a third note at his apartment and sets to work analyzing them.

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Fred fails to scam money off a couple pornographers. The Prometheus group has a beat-up-on-Bergamotte session.

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We meet Lucie, Lili’s old friend, and talk about Georges, Pierre and/or Igor for the first time. No sign of a secret society yet.

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Episode 3 – From Frederique to Sarah

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Colin talks to a Balzac professor and gets obsessed on the book “History of the Thirteen”… works to decode his secret messages.

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Fred pickpockets another diner, Lili’s group practices singing some more.

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Colin’s clues lead to Pauline’s shop.

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Thomas’s group is still trying to figure out Prometheus. First Thomas plays him, then Faune does.

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Fred tries to rob the wrong guy, gets beaten up by Marlon. Colin speaks!

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Thomas snuggles with Beatrice, calls Sarah up at the beach house.

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Fred ponders death some more and Thomas goes to the beach…

——————–
Episode 4 – From Sarah to Colin

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Thomas convinces Sarah to come back to Paris, takes one last walk on the beach.

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Colin sees Lili’s gang at the diner, recognizes Marie.

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Fred robs a horny young man, and Colin gets thrown out of the Paris Jour repeatedly.

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The groups do their thing.

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Fred experiments with death some more, and Colin introduces himself as a Paris Jour reporter to Pauline’s group.

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Renaud shows up and tries out with Lili’s group. Nicolas tries to pick up Fred.

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Colin gets close to Pauline, Thomas’s group tries another bizarre exercise.

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Fred meets a chess player… and steals some letters from his desk.

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Thomas visits Pauline at home, with her two kids and housekeeper Iris. I never figured this part out while watching the movie.

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Fred ponders her letters and Colin ponders his.

More Out 1: intro, actors/characters, story day 1

Episode 5 – From Colin to Pauline

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Frederique calls the chess player (Etienne) and offers his letters back at a price. He politely declines. Colin gets comfortable at Pauline’s place and eats all her jam.

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Business at usual with Thomas’s group, but Quentin’s new acquaintance Renaud is starting to take over the other group, makikng Lili uncomfortable.

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Fred can’t unload the letters on Lucie either, but Pauline is very interested.

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Quentin wins the lottery or a horse race or something, and Renaud steals the money minutes later. The celebration party goes on anyway.

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Sarah’s doing just fine at the Prometheus group. Lili’s group divides up the city to begin searching for Renaud.

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Pauline buys two of Fred’s letters.

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Warok and Iris are not impressed.

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Colin meets Sarah, who has business with Pauline… and follows Sarah to the theater.

——————–
Episode 6 – From Pauline to Emilie

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The search for Renaud is on.

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Colin plays a newspaper man again and interviews Thomas, while Sarah looks on amused. Then he hangs around and bothers Beatrice.

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Fred finds Warok, and Colin brings a young lady home.

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Thomas likes Sarah AND Beatrice. Wikipedia says they “engage in a threesome” but I think they’re reading too much into it.

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“Lorenzo’s envoy” comes calling at Pauline’s place. She knocks him out, stashes him in the basement and flees. I don’t get this part. Talks to Colin first… it’s the last time he’ll see her in the course of the movie.

David Ehrenstein, from the (now hidden) comments:

The part you “don’t get” has to do with the massive revelation that “L’Angle du Hasard” is a cover for a sinister underground. Up until this point “Les 13” is simply an idea that several of the characters toyed with at some point in the past. But what Sarah and Pauline/Emily are up to is very much in earnest, as are Renaud’s dealings which lead to Frederique’s death (a sequence not included in any form in “Out 1: Spectre.”)

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Thomas talks to Etienne about these letters and the group. Fred checks out the guy Honey Moon has a crush on… it’s Renaud!

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Lili has gone missing, so Quentin joins Thomas’s group.

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Colin nearly breaks down over his letters… finally hits upon the coded word: WAROK.

——————–
Episode 7 – From Emilie to Lucie

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Colin finds Warok, who gives him no clues. Fred didn’t actually cut & dye her hair, but was only wearing her Intrigue Wig.

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What of our two theater groups? Thomas’s group is doing jolly well, but Lili is wandering the beach on her own.

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Elaine alerts Lucie that Lili is gone… Lucie is standoffish. Beatrice meets her guy for the last time, I believe.

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Iris and Sarah confront Emilie (formerly Pauline) when she tries to send her purchased letters to the papers, trying to implicate Pierre in her boyfriend Igor’s disappearance.

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Fred and Renaud make a cute couple.

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Colin can’t find Emilie… because she’s gone to the beach house and met up with Lili.

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Thomas talks with his co-conspirators about the Emilie Letters Affair… then goes off to the beach house with Achille and Faune.

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Fred and Renaud get comfy. Colin gets no answers from Sarah.

——————–
Episode 8 – From Lucie to Marie

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The beach house group has some tea. Emilie goes over things with a semi-hostile Sarah.

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Colin gathers his thoughts. Fred dreams of death some more.

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Either the beach house is turning into a Celine & Julie creep-fest, or everyone’s messing with Emilie’s mind. Thomas reconnects with his old flame Lili.

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Colin revisits Warok, sees Lucie, gets frustrated with the whole thing.

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This shot has been recurring in the last few episodes. At first I thought it was a wide shot of Quentin’s oddball search for Renaud, but I never did see Quentin in the frame. Now Q is off doing theater I suppose and this shot comes back in episode 8. Can’t explain.

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I don’t know what she’s thinking, but Frederique goes all Feuillade and starts stalking Renaud while he has a secret rooftop meeting with some guys.

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She surprises him and he kills her by accident.

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Emilie gets a phone call from her beloved Igor. He’s waiting for her at Warok’s house. She and Lili leave straight away for Paris.

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Colin is back at work in the cafes with his harmonica.

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Thomas breaks down out on the beach. Maybe something to do with losing Beatrice, Sarah and now Lili? The theater group? The group of 13? The letters? Igor’s return? Not really worried about it, because it seems a fitting ending.

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Final shot, Marie, still looking for Renaud?

More Out 1: intro, story day 1, story day 2

Prometheus Group:

Thomas – Michael Lonsdale, in a couple movies by Francois Truffaut and Marguerite Duras, Resnais’s Stavisky, Bunuel’s Phantom of Liberty, Welles’ The Trial, and some American thrillers like Ronin, Munich, and Moonraker.
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Leader of the group, friend of Sarah, overall conspirator. Seems in charge for the first half and gets progressively more unhinged towards the end, possibly because of his romantic interest in Lili, Sarah, and/or Beatrice.

Achille – Sylvain Corthay, had small parts in Demy’s Donkey Skin and Rivette’s Joan of Arc. Has a public website and email address.
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Beatrice – Edwine Moatti
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Leaves the group towards the end of the movie.

Bergamotte – Bernadette Onfroy
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Rose – Christiane Corthay
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Faune – Monique Clément, played Myrtille in Celine & Julie (who was that?)
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Seven Against Thebes Group:

Lili – Michèle Moretti, from Rivette’s L’Amour fou. Still active in TV and movies, has been in a lot of stuff, incl. an André Téchiné film.
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Lili leads the Thebes group. She’s one of the 13, and used to be in Thomas’s group before she left and started her own using different techniques.

Quentin – Pierre Baillot, started out in William Klein’s famous 60’s movies, later in Rivette’s Joan of Arc.
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Wins a million francs on a horse race, which is immediately stolen by Renaud. At the end, when things start unravelling, he’s the only member of Lili’s group to join Thomas’s.

Marie – Hermine Karagheuz, played a nurse in Secret Defense, also in Merry Go Round and Duelle.
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Sent the letters to Colin? So, a friend of Pierre?

Nicolas – Marcel Bozonnet, also in Rivette’s Joan of Arc and Up Down Fragile.
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AKA Arsenal, Papa, Théo, Yogurt and others. I think each character calls him by a different name. A real ladies’ man. These two things may be related.

Elaine – Karen Puig
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The one who tells Lucie when Lili runs off to Obade

Solo Artists:

Colin – Jean-Pierre Leaud, french new wave poster boy, one of my favorite actors, star of Truffaut’s Antoine Doinel series, also appeared in films by Jean-Luc Godard, Agnes Varda, Jean Cocteau, Luc Moullet, Catherine Breillat, Raoul Ruiz, Jean Eustache, Philippe Garrel, Aki Kaurismäki, Olivier Assayas, Bernardo Bertolucci and Tsai Ming-Liang.
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Colin is first credited as “the deaf-mute”. Gets coded messages that lead him around the city trying to uncover the secret group of thirteen. Falls for Pauline (Emilie) and hangs out at her shop.

Frederique – Juliet Berto also played Celine! Also in Duelle and a few Godard movies, died in 1990.
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Along with Colin, one of the two who seem to drive the plot. Steals some letters between members of the 13 and tries to uncover the group and sell the letters.

Conspirators:

Emilie – Bulle Ogier, played Camille (the blonde ghost) in Celine & Julie. Starred in Duelle, Gang of Four, Don’t Touch The Axe and L’Amour Fou, also in Discreet Charm and Irma Vep.
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Known as Pauline in Paris, has two kids by her lover Igor who has disappeared. Runs a shop in Paris, where Colin meets her. May own the house in Obade, too, so either she or Igor is wealthy.

Sarah – Bernadette Lafont, an original nouvelle vague actress, starring in Truffaut’s Les Mistons and Chabrol’s Les Bonnes Femmes and Le Beau Serge. Has been in a ton of things, incl. Noroit, Ruiz’s Genealogies of a Crime, Malle’s Le Voleur, and The Mother and the Whore.
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An old friend of Thomas’s, her return to Paris leads eventually to the breakup of the Prometheus group, or at least the abandonment of the play.

Renaud – Alain Libolt, appeared in Army of Shadows and a few Eric Rohmer films.
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The object of Honeymoon’s affection, ends up dating Frederique after stealing Quentin’s cash and fleeing the Thebes group.

Lucie – Francoise Fabian, title role in My Night at Maud’s and the mother in Secret Defense, among many others.
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Lawyer, friend of Lili, seems to know everyone.

Warok – Jean Bouise, in a ton of movies I haven’t heard of, plus The War Is Over, Z, and Joseph Losey’s Mr. Klein, which had a bunch of interesting actors in it. Died before the release of his final film, La Femme Nikita.
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Member (maybe leader) of the 13.

Etienne – Jacques Donoil-Valcroze, co-founder of Cahiers du Cinema, died in 1989. A screenwriter and director from as far back as 1956, played the husband in Le Coup du Berger.
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Chess player whose letters get stolen by Frederique.

Iris – Ode Bitton
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Emilie’s nanny

Georges, Pierre and Igor
Members of the 13, mentioned in conversations, letter and phone calls but never seen.

Minor Cast:

Honeymoon – Michel Berto, got small parts in Merry Go Round and Joan of Arc, died in 1995.
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Frederique’s only real friend, it seems.

Max
Quentin’s son.

Nicolas’s friend
I think her character’s only purpose is for numerology’s sake… she and Max help search for Renaud after the theft, dividing the city into seven sections.

Gian-Reto – Barbet Schroeder, played the guy in the house in Celine & Julie and has a part in Don’t Touch The Axe. Directed Maitresse and some famed documentaries in the 70’s and since the late 80’s he’s been making commercial Hollywood thrillers.

Martin, Chausette, Leonard
Hangers-on at Elaine/Pauline’s shop, trying to start a newspaper or magazine.

Colin’s landlady – Gilette Barbier, had small roles in The Nun and movies by Rossellini, Resnais, Varda and Juan Luis Buñuel.
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L’ethnologue – Michel Delahaye of L’Amour Fou and The Nun, has small parts in Truffaut and Godard films.
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Chaussette
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Lorenzo’s envoy – Stéphane Tchalgadjieff, producer of Out 1. He was somehow still willing to work with Rivette afterwards, producing Noroit, Duelle and Merry Go Round. Also The Devil Probably, India Song, Beyond the Clouds and Eros.
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Le Balzacien – played by director Eric Rohmer
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The charactors (actors) and their relationships seem more important than plot/storyline, so I’ve made a page for the characters first, then a story summary page, separated into day one and day two, totalling my most complex journal entry to date!

I spent all this time on plot and character description, not necessarily because the story elements are so important, but because I may not get to see this again and I want to be able to remember it.

Thankfully, I have a downloaded copy of the movie from Raitre Italian TV, so I can get lots of screen shots.

But what of the movie, overall? Worth the trip to New York to see it, for sure. A total experience of a film, from the dedicated audience to the live subtitles to the 16mm presentation to the museum theater that hosted it to the sheer length and intermissions to the Jean-Michel Frodon (Cahiers du Cinema editor) introduction to the content, with its very long wide shots and very gradually developing story… many scenes that only form a complete big-picure scenario if you’re paying close attention for most of its runtime.

Dennis Lim of the NY Times called it “the cinephile’s holy grail” and says:

In the annals of monumental cinema there are few objects more sacred than Mr. Rivette’s 12 1/2-hour OUT 1. Shot in the spring of 1970, this fabled colossus owes its stature not just to its immodest duration but also to its rarity. Commissioned and then rejected by French television, the film had its premiere on Sept. 9 and 10, 1971, at the Maison de la Culture in Le Havre before receding into obscurity . . . has become a true phantom film whose reputation rests on its unattainability . . . Mr. Rivette worked without a script, relying instead on a diagram that mapped the junctures at which members of his large ensemble cast would intersect. The actors came up with their dialogue; the only thing Mr. Rivette actually wrote were the enigmatic notes Mr. Léaud’s character receives . . . With OUT 1 he found the perfect match of form and content, an outsize canvas for a narrative too vast to apprehend. In a 1973 interview Mr. Rivette described the film’s creep from quasi-documentary to drama in ominous terms: the fiction ‘swallows everything up and finally auto-destructs’.

I love it – not just a legendary museum curiosity that people pretend to like to impress other cinephiles, but actually an amazing film worthy of its reputation. Of course, mostly its reputation is that of an unattainable film (we were told this was the eighth-ever public screening), not of a great masterwork… but I guess it’s worthy of both of those.

The experimental theater exercises get very long, even too long, but not tedious. If a scene lasts “too long” in a regular movie, maybe you could’ve trimmed two minutes to make it feel right. But the theater scenes aren’t necessary at all, from a story point of view, so there’s no telling how long they need to be. When it hits me that I’ve been watching the same theater scene for twenty minutes, it’s not annoyance but awe that hits me. It’s hard to say what exactly is necessary in this movie… once you start cutting or shortening scenes, tying up loose ends and clarifying character connections and histories, you’re talking about a different movie (and not SPECTRE, but a different movie entirely). Best leave it the unwieldy beast it is, and appreciate it as that.

Dennis Lim’s article is a good one… here’s more:

“Out 1” now seems a relic of a bohemian heyday, a time when you could spend your days rehearsing ancient Greek plays or making 12-hour films. But even in 1970 that hazy idyll was already fading. The film takes its shape, as Mr. Rosenbaum has noted, from “the successive building and shattering of utopian dreams.” An epic meditation on the relationship between the individual and the collective, “Out 1” devotes its second half to fracture and dissolution. But it’s not a depressing film, perhaps because its implicit pessimism is refuted by its very existence. Experiential in the extreme, “Out 1” cannot help transforming the solitary act of moviegoing into a communal one.

And Lim says that Rivette’s 2007 movie Don’t Touch The Axe will be revisiting Balzac’s “History of the Thirteen”. “Does this represent a closing of the circle? An expansion of the master plan? If there’s one thing we know from Mr. Rivette’s films, it’s that the big picture will remain just outside our grasp.”

Ah ha: Rivette’s interview from Film Comment… he says shots of Paris’s landmarks “were inserted…frankly as empty spaces. As a kind of visual silence. . .” I had been wondering.

Reverse Shot says: “In Rivette there’s a sense, not just of watching or duration, both of which are passive ideas, but of actively being put through a process”.

Crawford in Reverse Shot:

Out 1 was made in the aftermath of the social uprising of May ’68, when a series of strikes by Parisian student unions devolved into a full-bore confrontation with the military. What once began as a hope to radically reinvent the mores of a stagnant and conservative society ended meekly, with the unions urging a peaceable return to work and De Gaulle’s party consolidating its power to a greater degree than ever. Out 1 taps into this post-May ’68 malaise, betraying an abiding mistrust in grand social movements, services organizations. Paris is turned into a disconnected amalgam of individual groups hermetically sealed off from one another. . .

Is it too simplistic to describe Colin as a spectator’s surrogate and leave it at that? What do we make of choice to pose as a deaf-mute and his return to that state at the end of the film? How, for that matter, do we take of the weird behavior of the male (Colin) and female (Frédérique) interlopers? Their logic and mode of behavior is vastly different from anyone else in the film; it’s like they’ve parachuted in from Céline and Julie Go Boating.

Set in Vienna, 1900, same as La Ronde. My third Ophuls movie, and the third with horse-drawn carriages.

Seems a straightforward old-hollywood love story at first, then seems a lot more grown-up and complex than its contemporaries after it’s over (and especially after checking out the DVD extras which conveniently explain everything so I don’t have to put in much thought myself).

Joan Fontaine lives in the same building as a famous concert pianist and falls madly in love with him. She lives her whole life thinking of him, but only meets him twice… once for a dream date at the end of which she gets pregnant, and again years later in a sad imitation of that date, where she desperately hopes he’ll recognize her, but he just recycles the same lines he used years earlier. She flees again, and as she and their son are dying of cholera, she writes him a letter telling her life story. He stays up all night reading it, forgetting to flee the duel he’d agreed to the night before with her husband. Nice.

Lots of graceful camera movements, one sick super excellent part I didn’t notice until watching the documentary (bottom screenshot) where she stands atop a staircase and watches him enter his apartment with a girl, repeated again later in the movie with the same camera position but with her as the girl. The kind of movie I like somewhat while watching, and like a lot more when it’s over… worth seeing again.

The novel by Stefan Zweig was filmed at least four other times. Ophuls made this between The Exile and Caught during his Hollywood period. The same year Welles made Macbeth, Hawks made Red River, Hitchcock made Rope, and the Italian Neorealist movement was taking off.

Joan Fontaine, star of Rebecca, Suspicion and Beyond a Reasonable Doubt:
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Candy apple scene:
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Louis Jordan, also of The Paradine Case, The VIPs, Octopussy and Swamp Thing:
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Suspicion:
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Postcolonial Wednesday, part two. Katy loved it because of the important story it tells, but I didn’t like it because it tells the story in the most predictably hollywood manner possible.

When the Hutus (largest group in Rwanda) decide to kill all the Tutsis (rich group that the colonialists put in charge), hotel manager Don Cheadle saves the day! Calls in all his favors from the Belgians and the UN and other Rwandans to protect his family and hotel guests. Goes pretty well for him (with some thrilling close-calls of course)… manages to save 1,000 people from horrible genocide.

Nick Nolte plays the disempowered UN captain who wants to help but can barely protect his own men since he’s not allowed to shoot. Joe Quinn Phoenix is a journalist who’s sent home with all the other non-UN foreigners halfway through the movie.

A really really good story told in straightforward, cliche hollywood movie format. Maybe I’m being too hard on the thing… it’s clearly a must-see movie because of the subject matter, and it’s well acted and well told… but it’s the kind of movie that doesn’t have to be great because it’s a true story about a great man who saved people from death, and how dare you criticize it? I’m just not the target audience for this… with my twin Joe Dante and Jacques Rivette obsessions, this one wasn’t very exciting. It’s probably better than Last King of Scotland, and definitely better than Amazing Grace and Sometimes In April (other rwandan genocide movie katy watched), which are the other new historical hollywood movies watched recently, so I’m feeling pretty good about this one overall. Maybe a 7/10.

Oscar® nominated Don Cheadle:
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Oscar® nominated Sophie Okonedo:
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Oscar® nominated Joe Quinn Phoenix (left):
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Oscar® nominated Nick Nolte:
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Sad Rwandan orphans:
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Postcolonial Wednesday, part one. I loved everything about the movie, but Katy didn’t like it because of its colonialist politics.

Based on a Rumer Godden novel, and she was on set during filming. Harriet is a young aspiring poet, who thinks she knows all about India… neighbor Valerie is the daughter of a rich American… and neighbor Melanie is half-Indian with an American father (Mr. John) trying to maintain both her American and Indian heritage. One day Captain John shows up and they all fall for him, though Melania tries to hide it. Oh and Harriet’s little brother Bogey has an unhealthy (and eventually fatal) interest in animals, especially poisonous snakes.

A gorgeous movie, looked great on the big screen. Life/death/love/loss themes throughout, all loosely tied (by Harriet more than by the Indians) to the river. The dream sequence told by Melanie (featuring two Indian gods and some dancing) is so great it even impressed Katy. Renoir movies make me feel more alive.

Harriet’s father, Esmond Knight, was in some Powell/Pressburger movies. Most of the other actors were in plenty of other films, except the nanny “Nan” who was in one more IMDB-credited movie… and Harriet, who never was in another movie, and died from cancer in 1967. Her real dad, a comic movie star in the early 30’s, died three weeks later.

CONTEXT: Jean Renoir made The River semi-independently in India after his Hollywood period (Woman on the Beach, Diary of a Chambermaid, etc) and right before his return to France with the celebrated Coach / Cancan / Elena trio. Came out around the same time as Statues Also DieSamuel Fuller was getting started… Bunuel’s Olvidados, Bresson’s Diary of a Country Priest… some good sci-fi was out in the States… Fritz Lang was making House by the River and Clash by Night and Ophuls had “Madame de…” and “Le Plaisir“.